The Coming of Spring

coming spring
The Coming of Spring: Constance Smedley, writer, suffragist, social activist, founder of the Lyceum Club 
by Maxwell Ashby Armfield  (1881 – 1972)

 

 

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Floralia

May Day Flora

Four Little Foxes

tree stump

Speak gently, Spring, and make no sudden sound;
For in my windy valley yesterday I found
New born foxes squirming on the ground —
     Speak gently.

Walk softly, March, forbear the bitter blow;
Her feet within a trap, her blood upon the snow,
The four little foxes saw their mother go–
    Walk softly.

Go lightly, Spring, oh give them no alarm;
When I covered them with boughs to shelter them from harm,
The thin blue foxes suckled at my arm —
     Go lightly.

Step softly, March, with your rampant hurricane;
Nuzzling one another and whimpering with pain,
The new little foxes are shivering in the rain —
    Step softly.

 

Lew Sarett (1888 – 1954)

May

bot birth v

Tuft of Cowslips

primula_durer2Albrecht Dürer (1471 – 1528)

The primrose, as every one knows, flowers a little earlier in the spring than the cowslip, and inhabits slightly different stations and districts. The primrose generally grows on banks or in woods, whilst the cowslip is found in more open places.
The cowslip is habitually visited during the day by the larger humble-bees (namely Bombus muscorum and hortorum), and at night by moths, as I have seen in the case of Cucullia. The primrose is never visited (and I speak after many years’ observation) by the larger humble-bees, and only rarely by the smaller kinds; hence its fertilisation must depend almost exclusively on moths.
Charles Darwin