Published in: on September 16, 2011 at 10:37 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Fruit Trees, Livia Villa, 30-20 bce

Published in: on August 24, 2011 at 5:25 am  Leave a Comment  
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Hydrangea hortensia

The work of A. Power, a Maidstone-based artist active around 1800. Very little is known of the artist’s life or identity, although his or her work was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1880.

Italian Porcupine

Ulisse Aldrovandi (11 September 1522 – 4 May 1605)

Published in: on August 9, 2011 at 4:20 am  Leave a Comment  
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Mount Monadnock


Abbott Handerson Thayer
  1849 – 1921, was an American artist, naturalist and teacher.  During the last third of his life, he worked together with his son, Gerald Handerson Thayer, on a major book about protective coloration in nature, titled Concealing Coloration in the Animal Kingdom: An Exposition of the Laws of Disguise Through Color and Pattern; Being a Summary of Abbott H. Thayer’s Disclosures.  In particular, beginning in 1892, he wrote about the function of countershading in nature, by which forms appear less round and less solid through inverted shading, by which he accounted for the white undersides of animals. This finding is still accepted widely, and is sometimes now called Thayer’s Law.
First published by Macmillan in 1909, then reissued in 1918, the book had an effect on the use of military camouflage during World War I.
As he aged, he suffered increasingly from panic attacks (which he termed “fright-fits”), nervous exhaustion, and suicidal thoughts, so much so that he was no longer allowed to go out in his boat alone on Dublin Pond.

The Sea – East Wind

Dwight William Tryon   1849 – 1925

Published in: on August 8, 2011 at 9:18 pm  Leave a Comment  
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It

“The assumption that animals are without rights and the illusion that our treatment of them has no moral significance is a positively outrageous example of Western crudity and barbarity. Universal compassion is the only guarantee of morality.”
Arthur Schopenhauer

Schopenhauer criticized Spinoza’s belief that animals are to be used as …a mere means for the satisfaction of humans
and protested against the use of the pronoun “it” in reference to animals because it led to the treatment of them as though they were inanimate things.

To reinforce his points, Schopenhauer referred to the look in the eyes of a monkey who had been shot and also the grief of a baby elephant whose mother had been killed by a hunter.

“Compassion for animals is intimately associated with goodness of character, and it may be confidently asserted that he who is cruel to living creatures cannot be a good man.”

Published in: on July 8, 2011 at 2:40 pm  Comments (1)  
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Pensée

James Abbott McNeill Whistler

For after all what is man in nature? A nothing in relation to infinity, all in relation to nothing, a central point between nothing and all and infinitely far from understanding either. The ends of things and their beginnings are impregnably concealed from him in an impenetrable secret. He is equally incapable of seeing the nothingness out of which he was drawn and the infinite in which he is engulfed.

Blaise Pascal, Pensées
Published in: on June 20, 2011 at 4:05 am  Leave a Comment  
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The Hidden Moon

hidden moon LBH

In articles for Yale Environment 360, New Yorker writer Elizabeth Kolbert reported on a study that found that the pace of global warming is outstripping projections, and on the possibility that scientists will designate a new geological epoch to reflect the changes that humans have caused.

charles rennie mackintosh aconite

Charles Rennie Mackintosh  1868 – 1928