The Celestial Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge

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In the essay “The Analytical Language of John Wilkins” (El idioma analítico de John Wilkins), published in 1942, Jorge Luis Borges writes:

“These ambiguities, redundancies, and deficiencies recall those attributed by Dr. Franz Kuhn to a certain Chinese encyclopedia called the Heavenly Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge. In its distant pages it is written that animals are divided into (a) those that belong to the emperor; (b) embalmed ones; (c) those that are trained; (d) suckling pigs; (e) mermaids; (f) fabulous ones; (g) stray dogs; (h) those that are included in this classification; (i) those that tremble as if they were mad; (j) innumerable ones; (k) those drawn with a very fine camel’s-hair brush; (l) etcetera; (m) those that have just broken the flower vase; (n) those that at a distance resemble flies.”

Eve’s Diary

whistler-nude-blossom1Venus Rising from the Sea
James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834 – 1903)

 

Stars are good, too. I wish I could get some to put in my hair. But I suppose I never can. You would be surprised to find how far off they are.

 

 

 

The Diaries of Adam and Eve

 

best-moth-gem“These remarkable photographs were taken by physiotherapist Miroslaw Swietek at around 3 am in the forest next to his home in Jaroszow, Poland.”

 

I feel like an experiment, I feel exactly like an experiment; it would be impossible for a person to feel more like an experiment than I do …
Everything looks better today than it did yesterday. In the rush of finishing up yesterday, the mountains were left in a ragged condition …
There are too many stars in some places and not enough in others, but that can be remedied presently, no doubt. The moon got loose last night, and slid down and fell out of the scheme — a very great loss; it breaks my heart to think of it. There isn’t another thing among the ornaments and decorations that is comparable to it for beauty and finish. It should have been fastened better. If we can only get it back again —


Eve’s Diary

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835 – 1910)

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1260946/The-stunning-pictures-sleeping-insects-covered-early-morning-dew.html#ixzz0pom0gmqA

 

The Strangeness Of It

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Damselfly
Joris Hoefnagel (b. 1542 Antwerp, Belgium, d. 1601 Vienna, Austria)

 

“Watching him, it seemed as if a fibre, very thin but pure, of the enormous energy of the world had been thrust into his frail and diminutive body… as if someone had taken a tiny bead of pure life and decking it as lightly as possible with down and feathers, had set it dancing and zig-zagging to show us the true nature of life. Thus displayed one could not get over the strangeness of it.”

 


“The Death of the Moth”
Virginia Woolf (1882 – 1941)