WHAT HAVE WE DONE

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/aug/06/starved-polar-bear-record-sea-ice-melt

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Oh Dear. Thank you for posting this. So, so awful. So awful.

    • Yes–And I’m sorry to post something so shocking & disturbing to see.
      I pick my way around so many things that I can’t afford to have burned into my brain; my own imagination will more than suffice, given just the shadow of a notion.
      But these conditions drag on & on as people have dithered past a point of no return–
      A year or so ago there were pictures of a polar bear isolated on a ridiculously tiny ice floe, surrounded by water that separated him from the next solid place to land by distances too great to swim. This bear would drown in the attempt, as would others in that predicament, and there was no way to prevent it at that point, though cameras could capture the desperate animal poised to make that hopeless choice, because there wasn’t any other.

      Every environmental issue is an issue because it involves just such consequences.
      And I don’t understand why people weren’t jolted into sensible response a century ago, when the patterns began to emerge.
      But at this stage, no matter which way we turn, there is some unendurable result coming at the end of a long chain of human action & nature’s reaction,
      and the world seems crowded with horror.

  2. Started a piteous catastrophe

    • Yes. I’m sorry to present such upsetting indications of human incapacity to take responsibility for our actions.
      I think of what you do as an attempt to pass on the fading tradition that can just faintly be traced — back to when landowners undertook to preserve what they were in charge of for future generations. I think of Russians walking through their forests, familiar with each tree; of the children who were taught to SEE the life in their gardens by learning to draw the creatures in the grass, in the trees, in the pond–acknowledging the existence of each; of caretakers whose skills were honored as fundamental to the family’s most precious inheritance; the housekeeper who knew how to use every herb, and also the vital importance of early scientists, who studied to discover the properties of plants, but also recorded them so beautifully that we treasure the renderings six, seven, eight centuries later.
      We’ve both removed ourselves from intimate interactions with our fellow living beings, and simultaneously interfered in their existence with the most careless cruelty.


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