A River No More

Young Kingfishers. The bird book: illustrating in natural colors more than seven hundred North American birds; also several hundred photographs of their nests and eggs by Chester A. Reed.

Young Kingfishers. The bird book: illustrating in natural colors more than seven hundred North American birds; also several hundred photographs of their nests and eggs by Chester A. Reed.

By William Yardley for the New York Times

Philip Fradkin, who died on July 8th, was a writer whose 13 books often focused on the legacy of environmental destruction in the West and took aim at what he and others viewed as the persistent misunderstanding and simplification of the region and its culture by many in the East.
One, “A River No More: The Colorado River and the West,” detailed how water wars, dams and development devastated that river’s natural course.

Philip Lawrence Fradkin was born in Manhattan on Feb. 28, 1935, the son of Dr. Leon H. Fradkin, a dentist who had migrated from Russia, and Elvira Kush, an activist who wrote and advocated for disarmament and women’s rights. He became enamored of the West during a road trip with his father when he was 14.

After graduating from Williams College he made his way westward, working for small newspapers in California in the early 1960s before being hired by The Los Angeles Times in 1964. He shared in a Pulitzer Prize the paper received in 1966 for its coverage of the Watts riots, and later covered the Vietnam War.

In 1970 he created an environmental beat at the paper. He left in 1975 — he said his editor had told him his articles were tilting toward environmentalism — and became an environmental policy expert in the administration of Gov. Jerry Brown.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/15/us/philip-fradkin-writer-of-western-themes-dies-at-77.html

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. How wonderful to see a nod to the Kingfishers. I first met Mr Kingfisher whenas a child, his story was one of the elementary lessons in my journey through nature. He was located at a perch on old oak tree bordering the shoreline in front of my family’s rustic summer cabin on a lake in watershed territory back east. His brilliant colors and tufted mantle were unforgettable and his swoops and dives into the spring fed lake provided many great moments of avian prowess. Recently I noticed that although the tree split off and lost a section into the lake, the boulders of granite anchoring it’s base still remain and a new generation of Kingfishers are splashing in after pursuit of the fat bass below.

    • Hi, Dearest Lynn.
      Notice: A mention in the following post, and the painting of one from a previous blog I sent you as a card.
      I think it’s about time that I met one in the ..mm..feather.
      I miss you. I hope your summer is summery even without the cabin on the lake.


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